Social networks require the right balance to come to life – Collaboration Atmosphere

February 21, 2011

 

In the analogy, think of how the high gravity that exists closer to the sun and how it affects movement. The closer to the center the more rigid and formal everything is. By the same token, the further from the center, the more loose and disconnected things are.

  • Rigid: portals managed centrally, typically by the communications department. Although too rigid for collaboration, they make for a good top down (tightly managed) communication channel where central control is important.
  • Formal: departmental sites, managed in accordance to corporate structures. At this level, collaborations is structured and based on pre-defined groups. Mostly used to share managed documents at the departmental level. Regulated by the department and policies.
  • Right Balance: not too structured not too loose. Governed by an evolving culture and guidelines. Although flexible to allow for non-anticipated types of collaboration and innovation (open collaboration), it is still connected enough to the enterprise goals and existing processes to produce tangible business value. This balance varies for each enterprise or organization.
  • Loose: collaboration groups or initiatives that are still forming (emergent) and may flow towards mainstream by finding the “right balance” or drift towards the disconnected oblivion.
  • Disconnected: so loose that it becomes disconnected. This includes the sprawl of collaboration sites that are disconnected from each other and at times from the organization as well. Although benign in small scales when it grows it aggravates problems such as data duplication, data quality and collaboration silos. Typically no policy, no guidelines and no visibility.

Related posts: Content Management Formality Spectrum & Social Network – The Intersection Diagram

 

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Enterprise 2.0 – SLATES Model

December 9, 2010

I am enjoying reading Andy McAffe’s “Enterprise 2.0” book. Here is a bull-eye type chart illustrating the SLATE concept (Search, Links, Authorship, Tags, Extensions, Signals) that summarizes what he calls the “Emergent Social Software Platforms” (ESSPs).


What “2.0” is all about

August 15, 2010

I really like this simple chart by Jessica Hagy from Indexed.


Enterprise 2.0 Team Dynamics

August 12, 2010

Companies often try to deploy collaborative solutions that are disconnected from their business, and face serious adoption challenges as employees struggle to see their relevance and value. These solutions eventually fade away while the stakeholders wait for the cargo to arrive (see “cargo cult“) and users find other ways to communicate.

The transformational power of an Enterprise 2.0 initiative lies in fostering and/or amplifying a real collaborative culture using tools that over time will integrate with the organization’s core systems, data stores and business processes. This requires strong sponsorship, a cross-functional team and focus on culture and process change. The diagram below illustrates three key layers to deploy and sustain a collaborative platform.

Enablers provide the infrastructure and change management support that underpins the Enterprise 2.0 (or Intranet 2.0) initiative. They continuously adapt the infrastructure and remove obstacles to maintain the right conditions for success.

Stewards are the content catalysts that make sure the solution is always in motion. They break the initial inertia and work with enablers to keep momentum. They play a key role in sustaining and curating the platform. Stewards know how to navigate the waters to maximize the wind in their sail… and when there is no wind, they are the motor that keeps the sailboat moving.

Users represent the broadest layer and are ultimately what sustains everything else (no more sailing analogies?). Individuals play different roles at different times as their level of engagement and collaboration needs change over time.

I’d love to hear your feedback.


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